Posts Tagged With: indonesia

Tanjung Puting National Park: Borneo, Indonesia

One of the last times we went to Indonesia, we took the opportunity to travel over to Kalimantan (north of Java) to visit Tanjung Puting National Park. First, here’s the flight path we took from Jakarta to Pangkalanbuun Iskandar:

I’ll reserve another post to talk about flying over to Kalimantan. It was an experience in itself that involved walking down a highway outside of Jakarta, getting a free taxi ride, and a tiny airplane. ūüôā

Tanjung Puting National Park. The park was originally designated as a game reserve in 1935. It wasn’t until 1982 when the national park was established and even since then it has had questionable protection mostly due to Palm Oil plantation in the surrounding lands (deforested areas). Nonetheless, it does remain wild and natural. The park consists of over 1100 square miles of area including the rivers that weave their way through the park before flowing into the Java Sea. Tanjung Puting is filled to the brim with wildlife, including multiple species of monkeys, gators, and a multitude of birds. It is most well known, however, for its Orangutans, made famous by a rehabilitation center at Camp Leakey. The orangutans, displaced mostly by the palm oil expansion (through deforestation), are nursed back to health and taught how to function as wild Orangs, before they are gradually re-released into the wild.

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Wildlife of Tanjung Puting

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Wildlife of Tanjung Puting

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Wildlife of Tanjung Puting

 

When you go to visit Tanjung Puting, you need to have a hired guide. This guide typically includes a boat (the only real way to explore the park). There are a multitude of services online that offer tours of the park for varying lengths of time. I must have spent weeks/months scouring through different tour services that sort of seemed sketchy or seemed really sketchy. After a multitude of emails back and forth with different options, I finally gave in and just booked with a company that would allow us to do a 2n/3d trip into the park. We were set to meet them at the airport and go from there.

Our boat was a traditional Indonesian boat similar to the boat we took in Flores to Komodo National Park, just a bit bigger. Our “area” was the top floor of the boat where there was a bed and mosquito net, a table with chairs, and some lounge chairs out on the deck. The bathroom was a flush toilet on the first floor– where the contents are flushed to is another story and a another mystery for another day. We met our crew and spoke with the tour operator- a woman and her husband run the business. Our tour guide for the trip was a young guy, maybe 18. He showed us around helped us get comfortable.

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Welcome Sign: Tanjung Puting

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Tanjung Puting National Park

 

For the next 3 days, we were immersed in the park and all it had to offer. Our tour guide talked to us about the difficulties of finding jobs in the local economy; trying to choose between acting as a tour guide in the part (few jobs) versus perhaps getting a better paying job in one of the palm oil plantations that were encroaching on the park. Our tour guide’s family was in the Orangutan business, so our tour guide was too. He worked at Camp Leakey, rehabilitating Orangs… bottle feeding them, rocking them, teaching them to look for food, and eventually helping to release them into the forest. Once Orangs are released, they work their way from platform station to platform station… working their way deeper into the forest.

We spent our days traveling to three platforms. The boat would dock and we would hike into the woods where some make-shift wooden benches were set-up for viewers. There were quite a few boats out on the river during our time in the park, but we never felt crowded. We were in our little oasis, taking pictures of monkeys and trees and birds. The forest was HOT. We were sweaty after only short hikes out to the platforms. We waited with baited breath while the park rangers brought out bananas and coconuts and called for the Orangs. As a part of the rehabilitation process, the Orangs are given varying amounts of food to help supplement their normal wild foraging. We held our breaths while Orang after Orang- moms, babies, and dads came out of nowhere. They walked right next to us, they swung from branches and limbs, they climbed trees, they sat on the platforms, and they ate. It was awesome!

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Male Orangutan

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Drinking some coconut milk

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Kissy Faces

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Just hanging out

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Nom Nom Nom

 

After each platform feeding time, we made our way back to our boat where our cook and guide set out cold drinks and snacks to re-energize us. We ate our meals in the wilds of Tanjung Puting National Park, on a small boat, surrounded by wildlife. At night, the boat was tied up anywhere along the river– wherever there was a spot and a tree to tie up to… we watched the stars and reflected on how fortunate we were to be able to be in that moment. We slept on the little mattress on the top deck, covered in a mosquito net, but open air. It was hot and we sweat through the night but it was so so worth it. If you ever get the chance, you should go. Just go and see what the big deal is… it changes your life.

When we eventually left the national park, three days later, we were in awe. We had seen and experienced so much. We reminisced about the previous day, when we had a Orang walk right past us on the trail. Then, when we were getting back on the boat, we snapped photo after photo of Orangs hanging on the docs and one Orang in particular that seemed to be playing with one of our crew. The Indonesian word for Orangutan is pronounced- “Oh-wrong-hoo-tahn” which means people of the forest. Indeed they are, indeed they are…

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Monkey in Tanjung Puting

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Monkey Species #2 in Tanjung Puting

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Monkey species #3 with baby

 

I remember reading Trip Advisor reviews of trips into the park much later, after we had returned to the states. I laughed and shook my head at people who left reviews like, “well the wine selection was mediocre at best on our boat”… honestly, if you are traveling to Tanjung Puting and your concern and thoughts are based on the wine selection, do me a favor, and don’t go. Stay at home, go out for an expensive bottle of wine in some stupid fancy restaurant. Leave the wilds of Indonesia and the graces of Orangutans to the people seeking adventure, to become one with nature, to be present in the wilds of the national park, and to¬†experience Orangutans for what they are- people of the forest. A trip to Tanjung Puting National Park will change your life. You will understand just how small you are in this huge, huge world. It is a place for contemplation, reflection, and appreciation. If you are a wild one at heart, then please, please go to Tanjung Puting National Park. Go, experience the world and the pure awesomeness that the park emanates. If you want wine and creature comforts, stay at home, read this blog post, and take a look at the pictures of the Orangs. You have no place in the wild.

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Just two buddies hanging out in a tree

 

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Categories: Indonesia | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Indonesia: Know Before You Go- Money & Language

As anyone traveling to a new country may tell you; if you know the language, you are good to go. The reality is that oftentimes, we travel to new places and only know very little of the language or sometimes, nothing at all. Not to fear! In our experiences in Indonesia [with very little Indonesian knowledge] we were still able to have a superb time. Tourism in Indonesia is a big draw and a big business, so many Indonesians know at least some English. As mentioned in the previous post on where Indonesia is in the world, Indonesians are required to take English in school… so many of them know at least some of the language. Additionally, in places such as Bali, where tourism is paramount, many people go to school specifically to work in the tourism industry, so they too, know English. But I digress, back to language in a bit. Let’s start with money.

Money

Indonesian currency is called “Rupiah” [roo-pee-ah]. As of May 2014,
1 Rupiah = $0.000087 USD
1 Rupiah = $0.000052 British Pounds
1 Rupiah = $0.000093 Australian Dollars
1 Rupiah = $0.0089 Japanese Yen
1 Rupiah = $0.00011 Singapore Dollars
For more information on exchange rates visit this site.

Indonesian Rupiah are extremely colorful and come in both bills and coins. The smallest bill that we have encountered is the 1000 rupiah. Coins are typically smaller denominations and although I recently read a website stating that it is possible to get a 100,000 rupiah coin, I have never seen larger than a 500 rupiah coin.

The bills come in 1,000; 2,000; 5,000; 10,000; 20,000; 50,000; and 100,000 rupiah. Based on the conversation rates to USD, a 100,000 rupiah bill is around $10.

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The rupiah coins that you most often see are 100, 200, & 500 rupiah:

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When you arrive in Indonesia, remember that you must pay $25 US for an on arrival visa. This can also be paid in rupiah if you happen to have it; we always make sure to carry US dollars with us just in case. So, we typically pay on arrival visa fees with that money.

You may choose to exchange money before you arrive in Indonesia. You may also choose to exchange money once you arrive. We simply take money out of an ATM in the airport. This just seems to be easier for us. While you do have to pay a transaction fee, it is typically smaller than the cost of exchanging through a booth. The downside is that there is a maximum on how much you can take out of the ATM at any one time [around Jakarta we found this to be between 1,000,000 and 2,500,000 rupiah or roughly $100-$250]. Depending on your plans, this may or may not work for you. For us, it worked perfectly.

If you are planning to go on an excursion of some sort and you book through the guide itself or a local Indonesian group, you will oftentimes have to pay the remaining balance in cash when the excursion begins. Because of this, taking money out of an ATM sometimes doesn’t get you the amount that you need, so be sure to keep that in mind based on your plans.

Many places in Indonesia take credit cards, especially when you are traveling to larger or more tourist-like destinations such as downtown Jakarta [a mall, for example] or main areas of Bali. However, note that taxis do not take credit cards and smaller restaurants do not either. So, it is always good to have some money on hand and if possible, get some smaller bills as well [purchase a drink to break larger bills].

Food and drink prices are typically a lot less than you would see in places like the US and obviously, if you choose to eat from a street cart instead of in the mall, you’ll be spending less money as well. As an example, there is a Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf [yes i know, not Indonesian at all] in the mall under the hotel we stayed in when in Jakarta. We purchased an iced coffee and an iced latte and the total was 74,000 rupiah [over $7!]. In comparison, every day that we ate lunch near Andrew’s office, we paid 100,000 rupiah [$10] for two entrees, 2 bottles of water, 2 coconut shakes, and a coconut water with coconut meat in it.

A final note on money in Indonesia- there is no tipping. Service industry employees typically are paid well [in comparison with those in the US at least] and the few times we’ve tried to tip, the recipients tried to turn it down!

Language

As previously mentioned, depending on where you are traveling in Indonesia, knowing the local language [Bahasa Indonesian] isn’t all that necessary, although you will obviously have a much easier time getting around if you do know at least a little Bahasa. In much of Bali, we had no problem getting around without Bahasa. In Jakarta, the main malls were fine with English, the smaller areas and the taxi drivers were not as good with English. For that reason, it is good to at least write down and practice a few words and/or phrases in Bahasa if you are planning to travel in Indonesia. For example, I do not like seafood. I loathe it. Unfortunately, much of this part of the world lives on it. So, I made sure to look up and write down a few words and phrases so that I could at least say “no seafood” or “vegetables please”, etc. *Note- if you are planning on taking taxis around an area such as Jakarta, it is helpful to have the address written down and a map with the location. To help with this, if you have your Smartphone, you can take a snapshot of the location on your map while you have wifi and save it to your phone so you can show your driver.*

Here are a few phrases that are good to know:

1РSatu (sah-two)        2РDua (doo-ah)       3РTiga (tee-gah)       4РEmpat (um-pot)      5РLima (lee-mah)

6РEnam (ahn-um)     7РTujuh (two-joo)    8РDelapan (del-ah-pan)      9РSembilan (som-be-lan)    10РSepuluh (sep-oo-loo)

Hi/Hello– Halo (hollow)

Thank You– Terimah kasi (tare-reem-ah kahs-see)

Good Morning– Selamat pagi ¬† (sla-maht pog-ghee) ¬† ¬†For other parts of the day use “Selamat” with the appropriate word:
Afternoon: Sore (sore-ay)
 Evening/Night: Malam (mahl-ahm)

YesРYa        NoРTidak

Right: Kanan (kahn-non)      Left: Kiri (key-ree)       Straight: Lurus (loo-roose)

Here: Di sini (dee scene-ee)   There: Di sana (dee sahn-nah)

This: Ini (een-knee)    That: Itu   (eat-two)

I would like: Saya minta (Sigh-ah mean-tah)

Water: Aire (ire) ¬† ¬† *Also called “aqua botol” (ah-quah boat-toll)

Fish: Ikan (eek-ahn)     Chicken: Ayam  (eye-ahm)     Vegetables: Sayur Sayuran  (sigh-your  sigh-your-ahn)

Fried: Goreng (gore-ang)     Roasted: Panggang  (pong-gong)

Noodle: Bakmi (bock-me) or just Mie (me)      Rice: Nasi

 

Additionally, here are a few apps that we found especially helpful for translating from English to Bahasa (free and available on IPhone):

1. Kamusku (Free): An offline Indonesian-English dictionary

2. Learn Indonesian (Free with option to upgrade for $5.00): A fun little app with categories that you would use/need to get around (greetings, general conversation, numbers, directions/places, transportation, eating out, etc.) The $5.00 upgrade will get you more detailed items like colors, family, dating, and feeling sick.

 

Categories: Indonesia, Travel Basics (Resources & Help) | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Pura Dajuma: Mention of Illegal Sea Turtle Harvesting

As described in our post on the first day of the trip, things didn’t go exactly as we had planned; namely, biking around Bali appeared to be perhaps, not the best choice. So, we decided after arriving at Pura Dajuma [our destination for the second night], that we would spend an additional evening there so we could regroup and figure out our plans for the remainder of the trip. This extra evening, unfortunately, meant that we would skip out on the far northwest Bali trip we had planned, but we decided it was for the best and that we’d keep that on the “to do” list for our next trip to Bali. The map below shows the travel route from our first night to our second night [Legong Keraton Beach Resort on night #1].
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Because we had another night at Pura Dajuma, we decided to simply check out the plot of land that we were on— it was naturally located down a dirt, bumpy secondary road… getting back up to the main road would require a chunk of time to walk or a taxi… we opted to check out the coastline and we are really glad we did. The day turned out to be a relaxing one and we saw a lot of cool sea life. Of course, the day also included us watching two young boys who walked down the beach to a box looking object in the water. They opened it up and one of the boys grabbed what was inside and threw it over his shoulder. We took a lot of pictures since we couldn’t see exactly what it was… after we reviewed the pictures at home… sure enough, it was a sea turtle. Further googling online also revealed that the killing of green sea turtles is illegal. We do not know if the turtle we saw was a green or other type, nor do we know the in-depth policies of sea turtle catching and killing in Indonesia. We do, however, know that Indonesians prefer to eat green sea turtles and that in recent months there has been a push to stop eating and killing of green sea turtles. Obviously, there was nothing we could really do, especially after the fact. I would, however, have liked to have a conversation with those boys to get a better understanding of what they were doing with it, why, etc… Naturally, I [Meghan], love sea turtles, am an environmentalist, and an avid animal lover. I also would like to uphold regulations such as not allowing green sea turtle harvesting. However, I also recognize that every person’s story is different. Part of the reason I enjoy traveling to different places around the world is that things like what we saw today make me stop and think. Is there a deeper reason other than “they just want money” for breaking a law? Perhaps they don’t have enough money to eat and this turtle will feed a family of four for many days. Perhaps selling the turtle will make a better life with less poverty. Perhaps, they just hate sea turtles. I want to be clear- I’m not okay with breaking the law, especially when it involves animals… I’m just saying that I would have liked to have the other side of the picture and the story to go with it.

Below are some pictures of the crazy things we saw during our day…

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Vacation for a Good Cause: Arthritis

Hello Friends:

Well, we’re about a month and a week away from a super crazy vacation for a good cause: arthritis. September 28th October 5th, Andrew and I will be biking 525 miles from San Francisco to Santa Monica, CA in the name of arthritis. We’ll be heading off with Andrew’s brother, Austin, and their cousin, Alex, along with a bunch of other folks from around the country.

This event is very personal to me, as I was diagnosed with Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS), a form of arthritis of the spine and back, less than 5 years ago. Injectors and ice in toe, we’ll be biking and camping along the Pacific Coast Highway and trying to raise money for the Arthritis Foundation and Arthritis Research.

We’re planning on getting some posts up here on the blog and also on twitter. Our twitter handles are @leachleachleac and @klasicm. Hope to see you there!

If you’re interested in donating (any amount is great), here’s the link to my page: http://afcabikeclassic.kintera.org/mklasic
If you’re interested in reading about why we’re riding, here’s the link: http://teamz.austinleach.com#sthash.W3Rdh4H0.dpuf

In the meantime, we’re getting ready for our next adventure: training for the California bike ride by biking in Bali, Indonesia for 10 days in early September!

See you around!

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